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796

Wm. S. Haynes

Boston, USA

Stamp: On body: (curved) WM. S. HAYNES/ (line)/ BOSTON, MASS/ 738. On foot: (monogram) WSH. Headjoint unstamped.

Comments: This is an outstanding flute; we are not sure why, but it does vary somewhat from the usual Wm. Haynes flutes. Perhaps this one was made by George.

Material: Made of black wood, probably grenadilla. Silver keys and trim, with gold springs (four steel replacements). Cork screw wood with silver tip.

System: This is the classic Haynes version of the Boehm and Mendler flutes used by Carl Wehner and others in the Boston Symphony. Closed G#, Bb trill, C foot, thumb crutch (removed).

Condition: Well used, but currently in perfect playing condition.

Pitch: Pitched at A=435 with the head pulled out. All the way in, it plays at A=440.

Sounding Length: Sounding length 605 mm.

Measurements: Emb. 11.9 x 10.2 mm. Scale 227 mm.

Weight: 487 g.

Case: In new Haynes case.

Sold!
Price: $4,300

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Photographs (click to enlarge):

Haynes #738 was made in 1903.  The Wm. Haynes output began with #507, after he had made 506 flutes under J. C. Haynes.  Something white remains in the name; possibly buffing compound.
This unusually strong and clean playing flute has been quite well used, and completely restored by the renowned David Chu.
Haynes #738 was made in 1903. The Wm. Haynes output began with #507, after he had made 506 flutes under J. C. Haynes. Something white remains in the name; possibly buffing compound. This unusually strong and clean playing flute has been quite well used, and completely restored by the renowned David Chu.
This flute appears to have been a considerable player.  The two bottom springs are replaced with steel, and the mechanism shows signs of previous wear, thanks to lots of playing.
This flute appears to have been a considerable player. The two bottom springs are replaced with steel, and the mechanism shows signs of previous wear, thanks to lots of playing.
This flute has been masterfully restored by David Chu.  He might not have been the first one.  Signs of shop work abound; obviously this flute was well liked.  Here we see the classic Boehm offset G, with the French independent G#.
This flute has been masterfully restored by David Chu. He might not have been the first one. Signs of shop work abound; obviously this flute was well liked. Here we see the classic Boehm offset G, with the French independent G#.
The spring catch for the C# is replaced, along with the spring.  This is one of the finest playing Haynes flutes we have seen.  Although it has had to be maintained, there are no signs of artist-driven damage on the flute.
The spring catch for the C# is replaced, along with the spring. This is one of the finest playing Haynes flutes we have seen. Although it has had to be maintained, there are no signs of artist-driven damage on the flute.
The classic pinned footjoint.  As usual, there is a small crack from the socket to the D# hole.  Unusually, the D# tone hole has been refitted.  Perhaps the crack disfigured the tone hole rim.
The classic pinned footjoint. As usual, there is a small crack from the socket to the D# hole. Unusually, the D# tone hole has been refitted. Perhaps the crack disfigured the tone hole rim.
Top view of the footjoint, showing the roller keys a la Boehm.
Top view of the footjoint, showing the roller keys a la Boehm.
Classic two-piece backclutch, with Boehm's adjustment screw.
Classic two-piece backclutch, with Boehm's adjustment screw.
The French thumb and side G# married to Boehm's structure really defines the American model flute prior to the rebirth of the silver flute in the 1920's.
The French thumb and side G# married to Boehm's structure really defines the American model flute prior to the rebirth of the silver flute in the 1920's.
Here we see Boehm's ball-screw, the enlarged strap to contain the offset G, and some work on the G post.
Here we see Boehm's ball-screw, the enlarged strap to contain the offset G, and some work on the G post.
The full metal tenon allows for a metal tube in the headjoint to slide in and out for tuning.  Happily, this flute plays precisely at A=440 with the slide all the way in.The full metal tenon allows for a metal tube in the headjoint to slide in and out for tuning. Happily, this flute plays precisely at A=440 with the slide all the way in.
This Haynes embouchure is based on Boehm's shape, but is undercut at 7 degrees like the Lot flutes.  Boehm's cut was generally closer to 90 degrees.This Haynes embouchure is based on Boehm's shape, but is undercut at 7 degrees like the Lot flutes. Boehm's cut was generally closer to 90 degrees.
The wooden crown, with protruding silver-tipped corkscrew.The wooden crown, with protruding silver-tipped corkscrew.